Another TWTT in the Works

It’s Week 2 in the latest Two Weeks to Taxi build in the Glasair Customer Assembly Center (CAC). They’re long days and there’s little time for anything but attending to the details, but builder Bob Seager reports that the project is on schedule and he’s having great fun. (And no, this Mr. Seager is not the singer of renown.)

Bob Seager (right) and his assistant in the second week's build, Shannon Parsons, stand in front of Bob's Sportsman project. The airplane will be based south of Calgary and have the Canadian registry C-FMMT once completed.
Bob Seager (right) and his assistant in the second week’s build, Shannon Parsons, stand in front of Seager’s Sportsman project. The airplane will be based south of Calgary and have the Canadian registry C-FMMT once completed.

Mr. Seager has been flying for “10 years or so” and considered a Glasair Sportsman for about a year before arriving to the point of building his own. He chose the Sportsman for its utility; it’s large useful load (950 lbs. outfitted with an IO-390) will work nicely for the hunting and fishing day trips he has in mind. Bob is starting out with tricycle gear and holding out conversion to taildragger landing gear as an option for the future.

When he’s not assembling airplanes, Mr. Seager is an executive vice president overseeing environmental services for Stantec, an engineering/environmental architecture consulting firm with 22,000 employees worldwide, 4,000 of whom fall under his leadership.

“Flying,” he notes, “is a great stress release.”

Mr. Seager will base his Sportsman in High River, south of Calgary, Canada. He is assisted in the second week  by Shannon Parsons,  friend and work associate.

Brown Build Continues Apace

It’s Week Two and Jeff Brown’s Two Weeks to Taxi project is well on its way. With the wings attached and the 210 hp IO-390 engine mounted, the structure is beginning to resemble the Sportsman aircraft it will be. Airworthy certification is just days away.

With wings on and the engine mounted, he future N317J begins to take shape.
With wings on and the engine mounted, the future N317J begins to take shape. Shaun Hunt stands above. Assembly manager Ryan Flickinger explains something inside the cockpit as the builder’s father, Kent Brown, looks on from a stool outside.

Jeff has a little flight time under his belt. Colonel Brown retired from the Air Force last December having flown C-130s through much of his career. He has enjoyed the building process so far and is struck by how much gets accomplished in so little time. His father finds the process “Interesting.” He hadn’t worked on an airplane before arriving at Glasair, but has several  rebuilt and restored Volvos to his credit.

Ryan and Jeff prepare to crimp flat cable as part of the rigging process for the Sportsman flaps.
Ryan and Jeff prepare to crimp flat cable as part of the rigging process for the Sportsman’s flaps.

Views of This Year’s BBQ

The presence of the Arlington Fly-In across the field is just too good an excuse not to stop all the busy-ness, settle back around good food, and enjoy a summer evening with coworkers, their families, and many of our Glasair friends. Herewith are a few views from this year’s barbecue. May they entice you to join us next year.

This past Friday evening we opened the hangar door, pulled out the high-production barbecue and set the picnic tables in place. Employees, their families and dogs, and Glasair clientele were invited.
This past Friday evening we opened the hangar door, pulled out the high-production barbecue and set the picnic tables in place. Employees, their families and dogs, and Glasair clientele were invited.

dkdkdk

Welder cum Master Burger Flipper Hilder Rosales did the honors through the evening.
Master Burger Flipper (and welder) Hilder Rosales did the honors through the evening.
A half dozen couples or so arrived in their Sportsman airplanes.
A half dozen couples or so arrived in their Sportsman airplanes.
Sportsman airplanes on the ramp at Glasair Aviation.
Sportsman airplanes on the ramp at Glasair Aviation.
No matter the venue, you can always count on Ted Setzers highly modified Sportsman on balloon tires to capture everyones attention.
No matter the venue, you can always count on Ted Setzer’s highly modified Sportsman on balloon tires to capture everyone’s attention.

TWTT Welcomes Jeff Brown

Although builder Jeff Brown arrived last week, it’s still early days in the latest Two Weeks to Taxi event taking place at Glasair Aviation. Jeff’s build did not begin until this past Monday, and, as is always the case, the important initial tasks aren’t all that showy. Soon, however, once work on the firewall is finalized, the engine will be set in place, and not long thereafter the wings. That’s when the project begins to feel real and the component parts take on the appearance of an honest airplane in the making. Exciting days ahead for Jeff and his father Kent.

Jeff Brown concentrates on the tail of his Sportsman in-the-making before its rudder is incorporated.
Jeff Brown concentrates on the tail of his Sportsman in-the-making before its rudder is incorporated.
Riveting wing covers is an exciting, if noisy, procedure for first-time builders. Sportsman wings enter the TWTT program already partially assembled.
Riveting wing covers is an exciting, if noisy, procedure for first-time builders and requires concentration and teamwork . A Glasair technician (unseen here) on the far side of the wing presses a bucking bar against the backside of the rivet and signals the builder to operate the rivet gun with a “Hit it!” The pounding of the rivet gun vibrates the bucking bar, smashing the backside of the rivet flat. Sportsman wings enter the TWTT program partially assembled.
Jeff's father Kent has joined him for the TWTT build. (It's always a good idea to have backup help along.) Here he studies portions of the seat rail assembly before drilling matching holes.
Jeff’s father Kent has joined him for the TWTT build. (It’s always a good idea to have backup help along.) Here he studies portions of the seat rail assembly before drilling matching holes.

Sportsman on Floats Meets the Good Year Blimp

Mellish floatplane meets Good Year blimp
You get a little bit of everything at the Arlington Fly-In. This year’s event (July 7 through 9) was no exception. Here Everett Mellish’s Sportsman on amphib floats keeps company with another icon of aviation, the Good Year blimp. The fly-in featured vintage flying displays, warbird airshows, aircraft judging, biplane rides, and forums — even military tank demos. Like we said, you get a little bit of everything. Plan to attend next year.

Dual AFS 5600 Units Meet Sportsman

IMG_1100 (003)
This classy panel featuring dual Advanced Flight System displays resides in Michael Hasz’s Glasair Sportsman, N98WT.

Just in are these eye-catching photos of two Advanced Flight System units in the panel of Michael Hasz’s Glasair Sportsman

The left side comprises the primary flight display (PFD) providing a broad array of information a pilot likes in one place, including airspeeds (IAS, TAS, ground speed, vertical speed), altitude, heading, and fuel quantity. It also houses an integrated autopilot, Comm, transponder and Engine Management System (EMS).

IMG_1083 (003)
The left-side PFD provides critical information a pilot requires to stay in control of his airplane.

The right-hand unit, as its shown, operates as the Multifunction Flight Display (MFD). Its mapping functionality is driven from information provided by the Comm/GPS housed in the center of the panel.

We hope to convince Mr. Hasz to display his Sportsman with us at AirVenture 2016 in Oshkosh at the end of the month (booths 253-254).

We’re accepting best guesses on the territory outside . We thought we recognized a Northwest theme, specifically Wenatchee, Wash.,  or the Columbia Gorge, and Portland, Oreg., but the lack of towering volcanic peaks for the latter leaves us wondering. Have an idea? — set us straight!

Factory –Installed BRS System Now an Option for Sportsman Aircraft

Glasair Aviation, in conjunction with BRS Aerospace, is making available whole-aircraft parachute recovery systems for upgrades on all models of Sportsman airplanes.

Parachute recovery systems are the best last option for pilots caught in unrecoverable spins or disoriented in nighttime or IMC conditions without a clear sense of the horizon or where or how to land. BRS Aerospace leads the industry with its aircraft ballistic recovery systems, which are credited with saving more than 350 lives.

The ballistic recovery system canopy shown during its BRS Aerospace testing phase.

The BRS system is available immediately on new Sportsman aircraft as a purchase upgrade and on previously built aircraft as a retrofit. It is not offered as a builder-installed upgrade at this time.

The BRS system weighs approximately 70 pounds installed behind Bulkhead A. As placed, the system does not reduce in-cabin storage by volume; exact numbers vary by the model and configuration of Sportsman, but the decrease in useful load is approximately 50 pounds. Pilots should determine their own weight and balance adjustments based on the characteristics of their airplanes.

 

Illustration showing placement of the BRS system within the airframe aft of Bulkhead A.

Illustration showing placement of the BRS system within the airframe aft of Bulkhead A.

 

Glasair offers the system for $33,950, which includes installation, deployment-compatible hatch, and pilot-activated in-cockpit release — and increased peace of mind, especially for pilots who fly with their families.

Buyers purchasing systems during AirVenture 2016 (July 25 – 31) receive a 10% show discount. You do not need to attend the show to qualify. Orders can be made at the show (booths 253-254) or by calling Glasair Aviation Customer Service at (360) 435-8533, Ext. 232.

To learn more about ballistic recovery systems, visit BRS Aerospace. To view ground tests of a whole-plane parachute launched from a Sportsman as designed, visit our Glasair Aviation Facebook page.